Archive for psychology

LOTUS – FP7 >>cordis.europa.eu

Low-cost highly conductive high resolution structures for flexible large area electronics by high throughput low temperature processing

From 2010-01-01 to 2012-12-31
The LOTUS proposal addresses the urgent need for a technology to produce the highly conductive patterns required for high throughput large volume manufacturing of flexible large area electronics. While all printed electronics need electric wiring LOTUS specifically targets the applications the most advanced towards commercialization: flexible thin-film photovoltaics, RFIDs, and OLEDs for lighting.…

Project details

Project reference: 248816
Status: Execution
Total cost: EUR 5 518 925
EU contribution: EUR 3 700 000

Programme acronym:
FP7-ICT

Subprogramme area:
ICT-2009.3.3 Flexible organic and large area electronics

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SUBITO – FP7 >>cordis.europa.eu

SUBITO

Surveillance of unattended baggage and the identification and tracking of the owner

From 2009-01-01 to 2011-10-31 | SUBITO website
The SUBITO programme has been developed to address Theme 10 – Security, specifically Topic SEC-2007-2.3-01 Detection of Unattended Goods and of Owner. It will focus on the automated real time detection of abandoned luggage or goods and the fast identification of the individual who left them and their subsequent path. The key design drivers will include an assessment of the situations faced in such…

Project details

Project reference: 218004
Status: CompletedTotal cost: EUR 3 897 587
EU contribution: EUR 2 581 052

Programme acronym:
FP7-SECURITY

Subprogramme area:
SEC-2007-2.3-01 Detection of unattended goods and of owner

Contract type:
Collaborative project (generic)

Coordinator

SELEX GALILEO LTD
UNITED KINGDOM

Participants

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Security Jam ***19/03/2012*** EU Home Affairs, NATO-EU, Defence Economy, New Threats >>securitydefenceagenda.org

EU Home Affairs, NATO-EU, Defence Economy, New Threats
19/03/2012 Security Jam

On March 19-23 2012, the SDA and IBM will partner with NATO Allied Command Transformation, the European External Action Service, the European Commission and the US Mission to NATO to bring together thousands of global security stakeholders. Representatives of national governments and armed forces, international institutions, NGOs, think-tanks, industry and the media will use this unique opportunity to collectively define the solutions to pressing security issues. The most innovative recommendations will be presented to the NATO and EU leaderships ahead of the May 2012 Chicago summits.

Visit the

Security Jam page for more information

Insitutional partners

 

GO AND SEE YOURSELF >>google.com

GO AND SEE YOURSELF

for investigators only … 🙂

(c) PERSEUS consortium – 2011 <<perseus-fp7.eu

Protection of European seas and borders through the intelligent use of surveillance

From 2011-01-01 to 2014-12-31 | PERSEUS website
PERSEUS contributes to Europe’s efforts to monitor illegal migration and combat related crime and goods smuggling by proposing a large scale demonstration of a EU Maritime surveillance System of Systems, on the basis of existing national systems and platforms, enhancing them with innovative capabilities and moving beyond EUROSUR’s 2013 expectations, addressing key challenges: ‘ supporting the netw…

Project details

Project reference: 261748
Status: Execution

Total cost: EUR 43 644 979
EU contribution: EUR 27 847 579

Programme acronym:
FP7-SECURITY

Subprogramme area:
SEC-2010.3.1-1 European-wide integrated border control system – phase II

Contract type:
Collaborative project (generic)

Coordinator

INDRA SISTEMAS S.A.
ESPAÑA

Participants

CORK INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
ÉIRE/IRELAND
BOEING RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY EUROPE S.L.
ESPAÑA
SOFRESUD
FRANCE
GUARDIA CIVIL ESPANOLA
ESPAÑA
INTUILAB
FRANCE
NATIONAL CENTER FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH “DEMOKRITOS”
HELLAS
MINISTRY OF CITIZENS PROTECTION
HELLAS
LAUREA-AMMATTIKORKEAKOULU OY
SUOMI/FINLAND
SATWAYS – PROIONTA KAI YPIRESIES TILEMATIKIS DIKTYAKON KAI TILEPIKINONIAKON EFARMOGON ETAIRIA PERIORISMENIS EFTHINIS EPE
HELLAS
INOV, INESC INOVACAO, INSTITUTO DE NOVAS TECNOLOGIAS
PORTUGAL
METEOSIM SL
ESPAÑA
ENGINEERING – INGEGNERIA INFORMATICA SPA
ITALIA
SKYTEK LTD
ÉIRE/IRELAND
DCNS SA
FRANCE
SES ASTRA TECHCOM SA
LUXEMBOURG (GRAND-DUCHÉ)
INGENIERA DE SISTEMAS PARA LA DEFENSA DE ESPANA SA-ISDEFE
ESPAÑA
MINISTRY OF NATIONAL DEFENCE, GREECE
HELLAS
MINISTERE DE L’INTERIEUR, DE L’OUTREMER ET DES COLLECTIVITES TERRITORIALES DIRECTION DE LA DEFENSE ET DE LA SECURITE CIVILES
FRANCE
NATO UNDERSEA RESEARCH CENTRE
ITALIA
DFRC AG
SCHWEIZ/SUISSE/SVIZZERA
EADS – CONSTRUCCIONES AERONAUTICAS S.A.
ESPAÑA
SAAB AKTIEBOLAG
SVERIGE
AJECO OY
SUOMI/FINLAND
FORÇA AÉREA PORTUGUESA
PORTUGAL
LUXSPACE SARL
LUXEMBOURG (GRAND-DUCHÉ)
EADS DEFENCE AND SECURITY SYSTEMS
FRANCE
ECORYS NEDERLAND B.V.
NEDERLAND
INSTITUTT FOR FREDSFORSKNING STIFTELSE
NORGE

Subjects

Security

Record number: 97515 / Last updated on (QVD): 2012-02-01

SunnyRomy

The PERSEUS 2012 annual conference will take place over 2 days, 29/3/2012 and 30/3/2012.

29/3/2012
: a day open to the public, where presentations will address the recent publication of the Eurosur draft legislative proposal, the deployment of the Eurosur pilot by Frontex and the latest advances in PERSEUS. This day is also the public day of the PERSEUS User Steering Committee.

29/03/2011 (evening):
Cocktail and Gala dinner, open to all attendees.

30/03/2012 (morning): the User Steering Committee will continue with a session restricted to PERSEUS users and observers, as well as the European Commission and European Agencies. This session will focus on refining the scenarios used in the 2013 campaigns across Portugal, Spain, France and Italy.

30/03/2012 (afternoon): the General Assembly, restricted to the PERSEUS partners, will take place in the afternoon.

Click here to view the agenda


Registration
The conference is free but pre-registration is compulsory, prior to the…

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Break Bad Habits By Developing an If-Then Plan ››lifehacker.com

Most habits are loops that we automatically repeat: a cue or trigger in our environment sets off our routine and the reward we get from the habit. Once we recognize this loop, we can develop a plan to change it. Here’s how.

Psychology and self-improvement blog The Emotion Machine notes that making a plan to act in a certain way at a certain time and place stacks the decks in our favor that we’ll be able to replace bad habits with new ones. These implementation intentions, in psychology terms, intercept the cue and the old routine and redirect to a new routine instead.

The basic idea is to form an if-then plan to help instill new habits. Write down and repeat your plan, such as, “If situation X arises, I will perform response Y.” X refers to the cue from your environment. Y refers to the new routine you want to replace with the old routine.

The key is to have that specific plan and know your triggers.

Some days you might miss your cue or you might really struggle and resort to your old habits, but that’s ok. It’ll take practice until the new habit loop is established. (And if this doesn’t work, don’t give up. There are lots of other things you can try to break bad habits, ultimately rewiring your brain for the better!)

 Identify Your Habit Loops | The Emotion Machine

 Contact Melanie Pinola:

Related Stories

via Break Bad Habits By Developing an If-Then Plan.

Brainwashing Techniques You Encounter Every Day (and How to Avoid Them) ››lifehacker.com

While it’s pretty unlikely that you’re a target of deliberate brainwashing, it is likely that you’re subject to some of the common techniques associated with the less-than-ethical practice. Here are a few common methods you encounter on a regular basis and what you can do to avoid them.

First things first, what is brainwashing exactly? Wikipedia offers a concise definition:

Mind control (also known as brainwashing, coercive persuasion, mind abuse, thought control, or thought reform) refers to a process in which a group or individual “systematically uses unethically manipulative methods to persuade others to conform to the wishes of the manipulator(s), often to the detriment of the person being manipulated”.

  • Basically, it’s a form of extreme manipulation. We often associate the practice with cults and don’t consider its presence in everyday life, yet the techniques used in brainwashing are frequently leveraged by advertisers, news networks, politicians, and others. Alex Long, writing for hacking blog Null Byte, provides an outline of some of the most common brainwashing techniques. Here are the most notable:
  • The manipulator offers you a number of choices, but the choices all lead to the same conclusion.
  • The same idea or phrase is frequently repeated to make sure it sticks in your brain.
  • Intense intelligence-dampening is performed by providing you with constant short snippets of information on various subjects. This trains you to have a short memory, makes the amount of information feel overwhelming, and the answers provided by the manipulator to be highly desired due to how overwhelmed you feel.
  • Emotional manipulation is used to put you in a heightened state, as this makes it harder for you to employ logic. Inducing fear and anger are among the most popular manipulated emotions.

When reading this list, you’re likely able to think of a few examples of these techniques. News channels and political parties often repeat a consistent message when they want to get their point across. Short snippets of information is also a common tactic on news networks. Advertisers love to offer choices that all lead to their product, and emotional manipulation is common in people you’ll encounter as well as in most forms of media—even seemingly (and sometimes actually) harmless mediums like film. These techniques are everywhere. They aren’t turning you into a zombie, but they are informing many of your choices. The good news is that you can avoid them if you’re proactive.

How to Avoid Brainwashing Techniques

Brainwashing Techniques You Encounter Every Day (and How to Avoid Them)Avoiding brainwashing techniques often involves avoiding the brainwashers themselves, but this is next to impossible. Taking advertising as an example, you can’t avoid them all and attempting to do so can be rather expensive if you still want to watch television and movies. Your best bet is to cut out what you can and, when you can’t, seek balance. Finding balance is often easiest by simply providing yourself with the information you need. All you need to do is the following:

  1. Identify the manipulative message you’ve received.
  2. Find an opposing message, whether it’s manipulative or not. Also attempt to find the most neutral and unbiased account of that same message.
  3. Compare your different sources and decide how you feel.

Brainwashing, whether mild or extreme, is possible in a large part due to isolation. If you only hear the brainwashed message on a regular basis, and rarely (or never) expose yourself to alternatives, you’re going to be far more likely to accept what you hear without thinking. If you want to avoid the brainwashing techniques discussed in this post, your best bet is to surround yourself with a spectrum of information rather than simply settling for the message that makes you feel comfortable. After all, that’s often what the message is aiming to do.

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How to Plant Ideas in Someones Mind ››lifehacker.com

If you’ve ever been convinced by a salesperson that you truly wanted a product, done something too instinctively, or made choices that seemed entirely out of character, then you’ve had an idea planted in your mind. Here’s how it’s done.

Before we get started, it’s worth noting that planting an idea in someone’s mind without them knowing is a form of manipulation. We’re not here to judge you, but this is the sort of thing most people consider evil, so you probably shouldn’t actually do anything you read here. Instead, use this information to stay sharp.

 

If you’ve seen the film Inception, you might think that planting an idea in someone’s mind is a difficult thing to do. It’s not. It’s ridiculously easy and it’s tough to avoid. We’re going to take a look at some of the ways it can work.

 

Reverse Psychology Actually Works

 

Reverse psychology has become an enormous cliché. I think this peaked in 1995 with the release of the film Jumanji. (If you’ve seen it and remember it, you know what I’m talking about.) The problem is that most people look at reverse psychology in a very simple way. For example, you’d say “I don’t care if you want to go risk your life jumping out of a plane” to try and convince someone not to go skydiving. This isn’t reverse psychology—it’s passive-aggressive. So let’s leave that all behind and start from scratch.

 

If you’re going to use logic reversals in your favor, you need to be subtle. Let’s say you want your roommate to do the dishes because it’s his or her turn. There’s always this approach:

 

“Hey, would you mind doing the dishes? It’s your turn.”

 

But in this example we’re assuming your roommate is lazy and the nice approach isn’t going to get the job done. So what do you do? Something like this:

 

“Hey, I’ve decided I don’t want to do the dishes anymore and am just going to start buying disposable stuff. Is that cool with you? If you want to give me some money, I can pick up extras for you, too.”

 

What this does is present the crappy alternative to not doing the dishes without placing any blame. Rather than being preoccupied with an accusation, your roommate is left to only consider the alternative. This is how reverse psychology can be effective, so long as you say it like you mean it.

 

Never Talk About the Idea — Talk Around It

 

Getting someone to want to do something can be tough if you know they’re not going to want to do it, so you need to make them believe it was their idea. This is a common instruction, especially for salespeople, but it’s much easier said than done. You have to look at planting ideas in the same way you’d look at solving a mystery. Slowly but surely you offer the target a series of clues until the obvious conclusion is the one you want. The key is to be patient, because if you rush through your “clues” it will be obvious. If you take it slow, the idea will form naturally in their mind all by itself.

 

Let’s say you’re trying to get your friend to eat healthier food. This is a good aim, but you’ve got a tough enemy: they’re addicted to the Colonel and need a bucket of fried chicken at least once a day. Out of concern you tell them to eat healthier. They either think that’s a good idea and then never do anything or just tell you to stop nagging them. For them to realize what they’re doing to their body, they need to have an epiphany and you can make that happen by talking around the issue.

 

To do this you need to be very clever and very subtle, otherwise it will be obvious. You can’t just say “oh, I read today that fried chicken is killing 10 million children in Arkansas every year” because that’s a load of crap and comes with an incredibly obvious motivation for saying it. If chicken is the target, you need to make chicken seem really unappealing. Next time you sneeze, make a joke about coming down with the avian flu. When you’re ordering at a restaurant together, verbally convey your decision to order something other than chicken because you just learned how most chicken is processed by restaurants. When you’ve done enough of these things—and, again, with enough space between them so that it doesn’t seem like odd behavior—you can start being a little more aggressive and stop going with your friend to get fried chicken. You can also take proactive steps to improve your own health and tell your friend 1) what you’re doing, and 2) how well it’s working for you. After a few weeks, if your friend hasn’t decided to reconsider his or her position on frequent fried chicken, you can casually mention it and they should be much more open to having a real discussion.

 

Undersell

 

Underselling is probably one of the easiest and most effective ways to plant an idea in someone’s mind. This is another version of reverse psychology but at a less aggressive level. Let’s say you’re trying to sell someone a hard drive. They could buy a 250GB, 500GB, or 1TB hard drive. You want to sell the largest hard drive possible because those cost more and mean more money for you. Your buyer is coming in with the idea that they want to spend the least money possible. You’re not going to get very far by telling them they should spend more money when you know they don’t want to. Instead, you need to cater to what they want: the cheap option. Here’s a sample dialogue:

 

Buyer: Can you tell me about this 250GB hard drive? I want to make sure it will work for me.

 

You: What kind of computer do you have and what do you want to use it for?

 

Buyer: I have a 2-year old Windows laptop and I need it to store my photos. I have about 30GB of photos.

 

You: 250GB is definitely more than enough for just storing your photos, so as long as you don’t have many more files you might want to put onto the drive it should be just fine for your needs.

 

This last sentence instills doubt in the buyer. You could even add “you’d only need a larger drive if you wanted to be absolutely sure you’ll have enough space in the future” but that might be pushing it a little bit. The point is, if you appear to have their best interests at heart it can be easy to make them think they want to buy more from you.

 


Again, I’d like to take this opportunity to remind everyone that planting ideas in the minds of others is not necessarily a nice thing to do. Use this information to detect when someone’s doing it to you and not necessarily as a guide to do it to somebody else.

You can contact Adam Dachis, the author of this post, at adachis@lifehacker.com. You can also follow him on Twitter and Facebook.

via How to Plant Ideas in Someones Mind – StumbleUpon.

Direct Link: http://lifehacker.com/5715912/how-to-plant-ideas-in-someones-mind?tag=manipulation/

Programme or Service Acronym: FP7-COOPERATION >>cordis.europa.eu

Specific Programme ‘Cooperation’ implementing the Seventh Framework Programme

Programme or Service Acronym: FP7-COOPERATION

Description Acronym: Specific FP7 Programme ‘Cooperation’

Programme Type: 7th FWP (Seventh Framework Programme)

Short Title: Specific Programme ‘Cooperation’

Title: Specific Programme ‘Cooperation’ implementing the Seventh Framework Programme

Subject Index Codes: Policies; Coordination, Cooperation; Scientific Research

Objectives: To gain leadership in key scientific and technological areas by supporting cooperation between universities, industry, research centres and public authorities across the European Union as well as the rest of the world. FP7 will distribute the benefits of research cooperation more widely across the major fields of progress in knowledge and technology where excellent research must be strengthened to address European social, economic, public health, environmental and industrial challenges.

The Specific Programme ‘Cooperation’ will be open to the participation of countries who have entered a research cooperation agreement with the European Union. It will also be open to the participation of entities from third countries and of international organisations for scientific cooperation.

Subdivisions of Programme: The following information was based on the official information available at the time of writing. Priorities and activities may change.
For the very latest information please consult the work programmes available with the appropriate call at:
http://cordis.europa.eu/fp7/dc/index.cfm

The ten themes determined for research actions are the following:

1) Health;
2) Food, Agriculture and Biotechnology;
3) Information and Communication Technologies;
4) Nanosciences, Nanotechnologies, Materials and new Production Technologies;
5) Energy;
6) Environment (including Climate Change);
7) Transport (including Aeronautics);
8) Socio-economic Sciences and Humanities;
9) Space;
10) Security.

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Ten Impressive Psychology Studies from 2011 | Psychology Today

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/neuronarrative/201112/ten-impressive-psychology-studies-2011

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